Press Releases

Morrison Food Service Workers at Mayo Charter House Announce Vote to Join SEIU Healthcare Minnesota

Latest group of food service workers to organize following Mayo’s outsourcing move announce resounding union election victory at Labor Day Picnic
Rochester, Minn — Food service workers employed by Morrison at the Mayo Charter House have voted to join SEIU Healthcare Minnesota. The workers voted by a 2-1 margin to join the union. Workers announced their victory at the Rochester Labor Day picnic Monday that was hosted by CURE and SEIU Healthcare Minnesota. The bargaining unit consists of 84 food service workers. 
 
Union_Family_rsFood service workers who led the campaign to win their union released the following statements following the vote.
Michael Roeder:
 
“In the recent years, we’ve all witnessed the rise in cost of living here in Rochester. However, with this rise should come an equally similar increase in wages, but that hasn’t been the case. People not only at the Charter House but all over the city are experiencing difficulty paying their bills because there is a disproportionate ratio of wages to the average cost of living. Because we formed our union, we are ready to join the fight to fix this problem,” said Roeder. “Even amidst management’s tactics to dissuade us from forming a union , low-balling offers and bringing in union-busters, we persevered because we all ignored their distractions. I am so glad we voted so overwhelmingly to join together and become members of SEIU Healthcare Minnesota.”
 
Cheryl Ouellette:
“In order for Charter House to be the preferred place to live, it first has to be the preferred place to work. We knew that the best way to make that happen after everything that has gone over the last year was to join together in the union,” said Ouellette. “I am so happy we now have a collective voice to make sure we can fight for the best for both workers and the community.”
Rhoda Mghenyi:
“Coming together in the union will unite us and lead us to real action. Our jobs will be more meaningful as we strive to make a better living and support for our families. We now have a voice to make changes at Charter which will be a better facility, if not the best campus at Mayo,” said Mghenyi. “We still have a lot of work to do, however we must remain focused on our goals. By coming together, we will enter a journey of greatness. We are stronger together and we will achieve more. Go Union!”
Bargaining dates will be set in the coming weeks.
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SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota.

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Mayo Food Service Workers with SEIU Healthcare Minnesota Vote Overwhelmingly to Approve Contract with Morrison

Food service workers see gains in pay, benefits and security for families in first contract with new employer following Mayo’s outsourcing

Rochester, Minn— After multiple days of voting, Mayo food service workers who were outsourced last year in a controversial decision by Mayo voted overwhelmingly to approve a new contract with Morrison. The bargaining team of food service workers from Mayo sites across Southern Minnesota started negotiating with their new employer Morrison in March and wrapped up last Tuesday evening. The contract achieved the goals food service workers had going in to bargaining around protecting worker standards, namely winning union insurance, a union retirement plan and preserving and advancing wage rates. A summary of the agreement is at the bottom of this release. 

Mayo_Picket_20160915_rsWinning the five-year contract follows a year of activity that saw multiple pickets outside of Mayo and immense community support for the workers and their families. Food service workers stood strong through all of the tumult to make certain food service jobs remained good jobs that would support families in our community. Workers, many with decades of experience, knew that winning this fight and maintaining standards would mean patients and visitors to Mayo facilities would be able to get the service that they deserved.

Some of the largest gains were made by food service workers who were previously employed by Sodexo, a group that voted overwhelmingly to join SEIU Healthcare Minnesota following the uproar around Mayo’s plan for food service workers. John Predmore is a 16 years food service worker from Rochester who was one of the Sodexo workers who voted to join SEIU Healthcare Minnesota last fall. After the vote, he commented on his excitement about the overwhelming “yes” vote by SEIU members approving the contract.

“I am so happy we voted to approve our contract. We hope this win shows all Mayo employees that by standing together positive changes can happen. We demanded respect and it feels good to know that we have a strong contract going forward. We went from lots of concerns when we heard the news, when things were very bleak and stressful, to joining the union and winning this great first contract. This gives our families the stability we need,” said Predmore. “We finally have some piece of mind around insurance, time off, retirement and wages. It’s a weight off our shoulders. It is good to know we are part of a union that will help watch our back. Like everyone who works to make sure Mayo provides a great experience for our patients, we know we have value no matter who signs our paycheck. This feels so good and we are so proud to have this contract passed.”

The contract will last five years.  Some of the highlights of the contract include:

  • Initial wage increases between 2.5% and 42%
  • 5 year contract duration with 2.5 % wage increases each year for existing employees and 2% increases to the start rates each year
  • Increased PTO and Holiday Pay
  • Full Union Health Insurance for both part-time and full-time members and improved dental coverage
  • Defined contribution 401K, $.50 per hour worked paid by the Employer
  • Overtime pay after 8 hours, requirements for defined shift times, and weekend shift differentials
  • Increased life insurance, Short Term Disability options and improved Bereavement Leave

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SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota.

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After Yearlong Fight, Mayo Food Service Workers Reach Tentative Agreement With New Employer Morrison

Coming together to fight back following controversial Mayo decision to outsource hundreds of employees, food service workers see big gains in pay, benefits and security for families in first contract

Rochester, Minn— Over 500 Mayo food service workers who were outsourced last year in a controversial decision by Mayo reached a tentative agreement with their new employer Morrison Healthcare. Food service workers from across multiple Mayo facilities in Rochester, Albert Lea, Fairbault, Fairmont and Mankato were represented on the bargaining team that has worked for months leading up to the July 1st date that will see the final food service workers officially transition to Morrison. In a unique arrangement, SEIU Healthcare Minnesota food service workers joined with food service workers represented by the AFSCME Council 65 and Teamsters Local 120 unions to bargain the first contract with Morrison. Highlights from the tentative agreement are at the bottom of the release.

mayo picket 2_rsBargaining team members from across facilities and unions expressed excitement about the gains they were able to achieve in bargaining, which began in March and wrapped up Tuesday evening. Goals going into the bargaining focused on protecting worker standards, namely winning union insurance, a union retirement plan and preserving and advancing wage rates. By working together and uniting the unions together under common demands, food service workers won all three and the workers who joined SEIU Healthcare Minnesota from being previously unorganized won huge wage increases to meet the standards of workers who were already union. Food service workers fought every step of the way to ensure these jobs remained good jobs that would support families in our community while ensuring that patients and visitors to Mayo facilities were able to get the service that they deserved. The tentative agreement will go to the facilities for a vote over the next week, and if approved the contract would last for five years.

Some of the largest gains were made by food service workers who were previously employed by Sodexo, a group that voted overwhelmingly to join SEIU Healthcare Minnesota following the uproar around Mayo’s plan for food service workers. Barb Andrew, who has worked in catering for Mayo in Rochester for 16 years, shared the excitement of the former Sodexo workers who joined SEIU Healthcare last year in a vote following the news of outsourcing.

“I was already so happy when we voted late last year to join SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, but I am even more excited following the huge gains in this contract for those of us who were formerly Sodexo workers. Joining the union was the best decision we made,” said Andrew. “The security of this contract for our families means our gains can’t be taken away, which is a weight off our shoulders. Getting back holiday pay, vacation time, improving retirement protections and other increases means so much to us. Winning strong healthcare also will help me sleep better at night, especially with all the chaos in the news about changes in the healthcare industry at the national level. When all the changes at Mayo came last year we were scared, confused and nervous. What we have achieved since voting to join SEIU Healthcare Minnesota is night and day.”

Other members of the bargaining team talked about how this tentative agreement, coming on the heels of such a tumultuous year for food service workers, was such an amazing victory for working families across southern Minnesota. Julie Larson has worked at Mayo Clinic Health System in Fairmont for over two decades and is a member of Teamsters Local 120, shared her impression on the tentative agreement.

“I’m very ecstatic about the agreement that we won. I’ve been with Mayo for two decades, so seeing our benefits cut in half and our insurance skyrocket after the change, it was very scary and devastating. We live in a rural area, so this job is so important to us and our community. This contract is the best we’ve had in my 25 years and I am so proud of what we won,” said Larson. “Knowing that we have a five-year contract means we have stability that means so much to our families. After all of the stress of the last year, it was nice to find out how good of a negotiating partner Morrison turned out to be.”

Another bargaining team member, Leslie Kaup, who has worked at Mayo in Albert Lea for 3 years, shared her excitement over the gains won in the new contract.

“When they first announced this decision a year ago we were all devastated, but I am so pleased with how things have turned out. When the change first happened, we didn’t know what the future would hold. I had just bought a house and a farm and worried about my future. I didn’t know if we’d have jobs and benefits. By coming together and fighting for what we deserve, we won a contract with amazing gains that solidifies our future and gives us real security. This means so much to us,” said Kaup. “The security is so important to Albert Lea and communities across southern Minnesota, and I’m glad that we didn’t let the way Mayo treated us stop us from fighting for what we deserve. Because we stuck together, and worked with other unions facing the same situation, we won a fair contract for hundreds of food service workers as we become Morrison employees.”

Following negotiations, representatives from the employers side praised the process that led to the agreement.

“We are glad to have reached a tentative agreement with our represented food service workers in various Mayo Health locations who will now have the opportunity to approve our agreement. We value the work done by our food service workers across Southern Minnesota and are proud to have reached this five-year agreement,” said Henry Dresser, a representative with Compass Group. “We look forward to continuing to work collaboratively with all three unions and building on the relationships we have started with these negotiations.”

The full tentative agreement will be shared with members of the unions in the coming days and voted on starting next week. Final results of the ratification vote are expect July 10th.

Some of the highlights of the contract include:

  • Initial wage increases between 2.5% and 42%
  • 5 year contract duration with 2.5 % wage increases each year for existing employees and 2% increases to the start rates each year
  • Increased PTO and Holiday Pay
  • Full Union Health Insurance for both part-time and full-time members and improved dental coverage
  • Defined contribution 401K, $.50 per hour worked paid by the Employer
  • Overtime pay after 8 hours, requirements for defined shift times, and weekend shift differentials
  • Increased life insurance, Short Term Disability options and improved Bereavement Leave

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SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota.

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Healthcare Workers Disappointed by Amendment to Minneapolis Minimum Wage, Say it Will Harm Seniors and People With Disabilities by Extending Care Crisis

Minneapolis — Yesterday the Minneapolis City Council passed an amendment that puts nursing home and in-home care workers on a slower track to get to $15, despite our state’s current care crisis that is causing seniors and people with disabilities to struggle to find quality care. The crisis is caused by the low wages and lack of benefits in the industry, and this amendment will slow down progress in the growing care industry. Care workers expressed disappointment at this move, which means workers at big corporate chains get to $15 before people who make sure our loved ones receive quality care. Healthcare workers noted that if they want to protect care workers, Council members should join workers and clients at the State Capitol in the fight for real investment in care work for families in Minneapolis and across the state.

2015 Scott_VivianEmma Woodard, who works at Providence Place nursing home in Minneapolis, shared the frustration at the move, especially in light of the challenges the industry is facing and the coming wave of baby boomers who will soon need care.

“It is amazing that in light of the growing care crisis facing seniors and people with disabilities in our state, caused by the lack of workers willing to do this important and challenging work for incredibly low wages and lack of benefits, that the Minneapolis City Council thinks the answer is to hold back wage gains for care workers,” said Woodard. “This will make things worse, and the result will be felt not just by those of us working in the industry, but by the families in Minneapolis and beyond who will continue to struggle to get the care that they deserve. It is hard to imagine why elected officials think holding back gains that will result in higher quality care for Minneapolis families is a good idea. Seniors, people with disabilities and all of our families deserve better than this.”

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SEIU is the workers who provide care and support for your family in public schools, hospitals, higher education, nursing homes, schools, in your homes and the Twin Cities’ largest public and private buildings. The SEIU Minnesota State Council coordinates the electoral, legislative and outreach work of the SEIU Locals in Minnesota to increase the effectiveness of their collective bargaining and new member organizing campaigns. By building the political involvement of the approximately 53,000 workers SEIU represents throughout the state, the State Council is working to improve the lives of all Minnesotans. The State Council’s board is comprised of elected leaders, members, and staff of the four SEIU Local Unions in Minnesota.

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After Tumultuous End to Legislative Session, Home Care Workers Celebrate Ratification of New Agreement – And Resolve to Fight for Full Funding to be Restored

New union contract raises pay floor, increases paid time off, grants holiday pay for the first time, funds training, and more, to help address care crisis facing seniors and people with disabilities across Minnesota

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Care workers and clients express frustration at anti-union group who attacked care workers, leading to a cut of half of the desperately needed funding, vow to continue fight to solve the state’s care crisis

Saint Paul — Home care workers and the state of Minnesota reached a new agreement for a union contract that covers approximately 27,000 Minnesota home care workers, with union members ratifying the contract Monday evening after a week of voting. The new contract will go into effect on July 1st.  The two sides had to negotiate a new contract after elected officials cut funding in half for the previous tentative agreement in the final Health and Human Services (HHS) Omnibus budget bill that was passed by the State House and Senate and signed into law by Governor Dayton late last month.

2015 Scott_VivianThe decrease in funding, which will slow the work being done to address the care crisis facing seniors and people with disabilities across Minnesota, came after repeated attacks on care workers and their clients from anti-union attorney Doug Seaton and the Center of the American Experiment. In legislative testimony, these groups – which have run a large-scale campaign since last summer to stop the union from negotiating a new agreement – advocated that legislators vote down raises and new benefits for home care workers. In expressing their anger at the reduction in funding that came as a result of these anti-union groups’ attacks, home care workers vowed to continue their fight next session, to restore funding to address the care crisis in Minnesota.

“So many good people all across the state worked hard pushing our elected officials to address the care crisis that is harming thousands of families like mine. Home care workers and clients like me negotiated in good faith earlier this year, but at the very end of the legislative session politicians decided to only fund half of what we had agreed to with the state, which is incredibly frustrating,” said Jim Carlisle, a home care client who counts on care for himself and his wife to be able to stay in their home. “We made some important steps forward in this new agreement, but the crisis in our state is well beyond the point where any half-measures will suffice.”

“This is, without exaggeration, a life or death situation for someone like me who relies on quality caregivers to get out of bed and do basic tasks like eating and leaving my house,” Carlisle continued.  “I’m proud we won the gains we did, but we are still a long way from where we need to be. What we’ve proven over the last few months is that we won’t let any attacks or setbacks stop us. We will fight to ensure every person who needs care has access to quality caregivers.”

Despite the challenges of fighting frivolous lawsuits and attacks from deep-pocketed special interest groups, union members expressed pride in the tireless effort put forward by people across the state to bring attention to the care crisis.

“Progress simply would not have happened without our union. We are so happy that we have a collective voice in this critical fight,” said Yasmine Soud Reynolds, a home care worker from White Bear Lake. “By coming together as home care workers, family members and clients from across the state, we have made it clear to everyone that we will be invisible no more. Because we worked together and told our stories, we had a group of legislators from both political parties author the bills to ratify and fund the original agreement we reached with the state in January. When some union-busting lawyers tried to block that bipartisan support for the wage and benefit improvements we so desperately need, the only reason we were able to resist their efforts and still make progress through this new agreement is that we stayed united. They were able to get elected officials to reduce the funding, but they weren’t able to stop us from moving forward.  We’ll be back next session to keep pushing for our state to address the care crisis, starting with restoring the funding lawmakers just cut.”

With the funding cut in half, the union’s bargaining team of workers, parents and clients had to go back to the bargaining table and reach a new agreement with the state, after engaging thousands of members in a difficult discussion of how to balance priorities. The new agreement was ratified after a week of voting that ended Monday evening.

Provisions of the new contract include:

  • A $1 an hour increase to the minimum wage for home care workers (the new floor is $12)
  • Time-and-a-half pay for workers who take care of their clients on five holidays, a benefit no home care workers in the state have had before
  • An increase in the amount of Paid Time Off home care workers earn
  • Training stipends for 5,000 workers who take voluntary trainings to build their skills in order to provide higher quality care
  • An online matching registry to help address the struggle clients face when trying to find quality care workers to bring into their homes
  • A 5% additional increase for those who work for the highest-need clients (defined as those who qualify for 12 or more hours per day of in-home care)

While proud of the gains, Delores Flynn, whose 46-year-old son Scott needs full time care after suffering a major brain hemorrhage, vowed that families will be back next session to demand that the funding lawmakers cut be restored

We will continue to fight until every Minnesotan who needs care has access to the quality care they need to stay in their home. We expect politicians to do right by restoring the funding they cut,” said Flynn, who lives in Roseville. “There is a crisis happening across our state. If this crisis hasn’t touched you or someone you love yet, it will. When it does, you will realize that this isn’t an issue we can ignore. With the coming wave of baby boomers who will want quality care to stay in their homes, this crisis is only going to grow if it is not truly addressed. Care work should not be a political issue, but it is frustrating that money desperately needed by our families was caught up in political games. We cannot risk having people with disabilities and seniors go without the care they need due to the chronic shortage of workers. It is far more expensive to care for people in a facility than it is providing care for them in their homes. Elected officials from all parties should make restoring the home care funding they cut the very first bill they pass when they come back to St. Paul.”

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SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota.

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Adjunct Faculty at St. Catherine University (St. Kate’s) File for Union Election to Join SEIU Local 284

Adjunct faculty at St. Paul university join wave of organizing in Twin Cities to improve higher education for students and faculty

St. Paul Adjunct faculty at St. Catherine University (St. Kate’s) filed cards this morning to trigger a union election to join the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 284. The election would cover around 100 adjunct faculty. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) will schedule the election for this summer unless there are objections from St. Kate’s administration. (more…)

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Minnesota Custodian Wins RISE (Recognizing Inspiring School Employees) Award, To Be Honored at Ceremony in Washington D.C.

Award winner will join school staff from across the nation today at a ceremony held at U.S. Botanic Garden

Washington D.C – Mike Poke, a custodian in the Wayzata Public Schools and member of SEIU Local 284, will be honored in Washington D.C. today as one of the 2017 Recognizing Inspiring School Employees (RISE) Award winners. The award is being given to five individuals from across the country who are doing extraordinary and inspirational things in their schools and communities to promote quality education, foster positive learning environments, and ensure student success.

mike_poke_NCCESEU_20170503Poke is joining four other award recipients, along with distinguished guests, at a ceremony in Washington D.C. at the United States Botanic Garden later this afternoon.

Mike Poke is a custodian in the Wayzata Schools in Minnesota. He is a member and elected officer on the Executive Board of SEIU Local 284, a union of almost 9,000 school staff across Minnesota. Mike began as what he calls a “regular custodian,” working the overnight shift to make sure the school was ready for students in the morning. But that changed about eight years ago when he was moved to the day shift and began having the chance to interact with students in the school.

He got to know the kids, especially those he saw struggling, and became a mentor to many of them. Students and parents called him when things were bad to see if I could help get students back on track.

“I didn’t have someone to keep me motivated when I was a young student, so now I work hard to be that support system for students who need a helping hand,” said Poke. “My mother told me it is important to always give back, and I bring that mindset every day in my job. These kids are our future, so we need to invest in them any way we can. I do the work beyond my job duties because it makes me feel good to see people I help achieve their goals.”

The National Coalition of Classified Education Support Employee Unions (NCCESEU), a coalition of state and national unions that together represent a million school support employees, gives the award. The award highlights the individual contributions of school staff and recognizes the essential role that all education professionals play in shaping our public schools.

There are more than 2.8 million classified education support employees in our nation’s public schools, colleges, and universities and they make up one-third of the public education workforce.  They ensure students achieve at their highest levels. They keep students fed, emotionally and physically healthy and safe, engaged and connected to the larger school community, and provide instruction and support that leads to academic success.

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The National Coalition of Classified Education Support Employee Unions (NCCESEU) is a coalition of state and national unions that together represent a million school support employees, including clerical and administrative staff, custodians, food service workers, health and student services workers, paraeducators, technology services employees, transportation workers, and security and skilled trades staff.

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SEIU Announces Third Wave of Minneapolis City Council Endorsements

Highlight candidates support of $15 Minimum Wage with No Tip Penalty amidst growing consensus on issue

Minneapolis — The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Minnesota State Council, who bring together nearly 8,000 people represented by SEIU who live or work in Minneapolis, are proud to announce the third wave of endorsements for Minneapolis City Council. This follows their earlier endorsements in Wards 2, 5, 8, 9, 11 and Ward 10.

SEIU mn LogoAs with previous endorsements, strong support for a $15 minimum wage with One Fair Wage (no tip penalty) was a deciding factor in the endorsement as it shows whether candidates will stand up for working families in Minneapolis.

The Executive Board of the SEIU Minnesota State Council endorsed in the following races:

  • Steve Fletcher in Ward 3
  • Council Member Abdi Warsame in Ward 6
  • Council Member Andrew Johnson in Ward 12

SEIU Minnesota State Council President Jamie Gulley released the following statement about the latest round of endorsements, highlighting the wave of momentum for $15 and One Fair Wage.

“In screening potential candidates, SEIU members, like a majority of Minneapolis residents, have made abundantly clear their desire to see the minimum wage increased to $15 with no one left behind by carveouts like the tip penalty. Minneapolis winning this important fight would be a powerful step towards addressing the low wages facing too many working people, especially women and people of color.

“As we announce these endorsements, recent events like SEIU-endorsed Jeremiah Ellison winning the Ward 5 DFL endorsement are highlighting the new reality for Minneapolis candidates. It is clear that those who don’t strongly and publicly support this commonsense plan to address the racial and economic disparities in our city will struggle to find support from Minneapolis voters. Our families are tired of corporations and the wealthy getting everything they want from self-interested politicians, and people are standing up and fighting back. If elected officials aren’t ready to address what is needed in this moment, they should know that voters will find someone who will.”

SEIU is turning out members to Ward Conventions across Minneapolis to support SEIU-endorsed candidates and to push for the Council and Mayor to pass a $15 minimum wage ordinance with no tip penalty this summer. More endorsements in Minneapolis will be released this spring.

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SEIU is the workers who provide care and support for your family in public schools, hospitals, higher education, nursing homes, schools, in your homes and the Twin Cities’ largest public and private buildings. The SEIU Minnesota State Council coordinates the electoral, legislative and outreach work of the SEIU Locals in Minnesota to increase the effectiveness of their collective bargaining and new member organizing campaigns. By building the political involvement of the approximately 53,000 workers SEIU represents throughout the state, the State Council is working to improve the lives of all Minnesotans. The State Council’s board is comprised of elected leaders, members, and staff of the four SEIU Local Unions in Minnesota.

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SEIU Announces Second Wave of Minneapolis City Council Endorsements Ahead of Precinct Caucuses

Minneapolis — The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Minnesota State Council, who bring together nearly 8,000 people represented by SEIU who live or work in Minneapolis, are proud to announce the second wave of endorsements for Minneapolis City Council. Following their endorsement of Council Member Lisa Bender, five additional endorsements were announced today just ahead of the Minneapolis DFL precinct caucuses on April 4th.

SEIU mn Logo“In the age of Trump, working families in Minneapolis need progressive champions who will be fighters for positive, progressive change and will stand up to attacks on our families if and when they come. We are proud to roll out our second round of endorsements for the Minneapolis City Council for five outstanding candidates. We look forward to working hard to elect these champions so we can work together to address the harmful income and racial disparities in the city and make Minneapolis a city that works for all families, not just the rich and well-connected,” said Jamie Gulley, President of SEIU Minnesota State Council.

The Executive Board of the SEIU Minnesota State Council endorsed in the following races:

  • Council Member Cam Gordon in Ward 2
  • Jeremiah Ellison in Ward 5
  • Andrea Jenkins in Ward 8
  • Council Member Alondra Cano in Ward 9
  • Council Member John Quincy in Ward 11

SEIU is turning out members to precinct caucuses across Minneapolis on April 4th to support endorsed candidates and to push for the Council and Mayor to pass a $15 minimum wage ordinance with no tip penalty this summer. More endorsements in Minneapolis will be released this spring.

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SEIU is the workers who provide care and support for your family in public schools, hospitals, higher education, nursing homes, schools, in your homes and the Twin Cities’ largest public and private buildings. The SEIU Minnesota State Council coordinates the electoral, legislative and outreach work of the SEIU Locals in Minnesota to increase the effectiveness of their collective bargaining and new member organizing campaigns. By building the political involvement of the approximately 53,000 workers SEIU represents throughout the state, the State Council is working to improve the lives of all Minnesotans. The State Council’s board is comprised of elected leaders, members, and staff of the four SEIU Local Unions in Minnesota.

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SEIU Healthcare Minnesota President Urges Governor Dayton to Veto Reinsurance Bill

St. Paul – Jamie Gulley, President of SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, released the following statement urging Governor Dayton to veto the reinsurance bill following its passage in both the Minnesota House and Senate.

“The reinsurance bill that is headed to Governor Dayton’s desk is simply a $542 million taxpayer-funded giveaway to insurance companies with no guarantees of lower premiums for working families in Minnesota. Our members working in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes and home care all across the state know that we need to lower healthcare costs for Minnesota families, but a bailout for corporate insurance companies is not a solution to the problem of rising healthcare costs.

“Why have the insurance companies refused to provide even the basic assurances Governor Dayton asked them for, promising to pass these taxpayer funds along directly to policy-holders and promising that they won’t just take the money and run from the individual health insurance market? Why aren’t we extending affordable, high-quality MinnesotaCare coverage as an option to the Minnesota families facing high premiums and deductibles? SEIU Healthcare Minnesota urges Governor Dayton to veto this bill and for lawmakers to go back to the drawing board to find a real solution to the rising healthcare costs in Minnesota.”

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SEIU Healthcare Minnesota unites more than 35,000 healthcare and long-term care workers in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and home care throughout the state of Minnesota.

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